Blog

Welcome to the blog for the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences. Posts on this site are the opinion of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Federation, its staff or its board of directors. Entries are posted in the language of the author.

Members of the university research community are invited to make guest blog submissions on issues relating to the wellbeing of the humanities and social sciences research and learning enterprise in Canada. Click here to read the Federations’ blog policy. Please send your submission to [email protected]es.ca.

Bringing history to life at National Capital History Day

Alisha Seguin, M. A. Candidate, Carleton University

On May 1, 2015, Carleton University will host National Capital History Day. Here, 350 aspiring young historians will bring enthusiasm, fresh perspectives, and healthy competition to Carleton University as they showcase vibrant projects on this year’s theme: “Leadership & Legacy in History”. Inaugurated last year, this competition has been adapted from...

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An architectural gem with a green lining

Monique Roy-Sole, Research Communications Officer, University of Ottawa

One of the major hubs of activity during Congress 2015 will be the Social Sciences Building, which houses the University of Ottawa’s largest faculty. Inaugurated in the fall of 2012, the modern, light-filled structure gathers the entire Faculty of Social Sciences — more than 10,000 students, 260 full-time professors and 100 staff — under one roof. For first time in the faculty’s 60-year history, its departments, schools and institute are no longer scattered all over campus.

The 15-storey tower in the heart of campus will be the site of the Big Thinking series at Congress and of several association conferences. The...

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Together from the start: Federation and the ASPP

Jessica Clark and Matthew McKean, Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

The ASPP (Awards to Scholarly Publications Program) has been, in one incarnation or another, at the heart of the Federation since day one. The competitive funding program, designed to assist with the publication of scholarly books on topics in the humanities and social sciences, has supported over 6000 books since it began.

In 1940, the Aid for Publication program was established, thanks to a $5000 grant from the Rockefeller Foundation. The goal was to ensure that completed works by “competent scholars” did not go unpublished. In the early days, Aid for Publication funding supported scholarly books recommended by the Canadian...

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A unique Canadian invention: 84th Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences

Jean-Marc Mangin and Nour Aoude, Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences

Some things change…

It can be hard to imagine that Congress, a meeting of more than 8,000 scholars and researchers, started when a handful of Canadian learned societies began exploring the idea of hosting their annual meetings at the same place, at the same time. In fact, there is evidence of this happening as early as 1922! Early players like the Canadian Political Science Association (CPSA), the Canadian Historical Society (now the Canadian Historical Association) and the Royal Society took the lead on this through the 1930s and 40s, calling themselves the ‘Learneds’. This may sound very grand, but our best estimates suggest that the whole population of...

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The Publisher's Role and its Challenges

 

Nota bene: The Federation works with many publishers through its Awards to Scholarly Publications Program (ASPP). We admire the work they do, though we also know that it is not well understood. So in honour of World Book and Copyright Day, we have commission this translation of an excellent article that explores the many facets of the publishing profession. This project was possible because the original French article was published in Open Access in the Presses de l'Université de Montréal's Parcours numériques series. The Federation is a long-time supporter of Open Access, though this is perhaps the first time it has...

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